Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
Log in
Sections
Home > Events > 2017 Ph.D. Defenses

2017 Ph.D. Defenses

Apr

27

2017

PhD Candidate Satyaki Bhattacharjee - "Reduced Order Multiscale Modeling of Nonlinear Processes In Heterogeneous Materials"

WHERE: 257G Fitzpatrick Hall
FROM: 3:00PM TO 5:00PM

Predicting effective material properties of nonlinear heterogeneous materials from the knowledge of its micro-structure through numerical modeling and computational homogenization (CH) has many applications in engineering design. Direct numerical modeling (DNM) using finite element method (FEM) is capable of predicting material behavior accurately. Unfortunately, DNM and/or CH are computationally expensive methods.

Read More…

Apr

5

2017

PhD Candidate Samuel J. Jones - "Embedded Large Eddy Simulation for High Pressure Turbine Tip Clearance Analysis"

WHERE: B029 Hessert Laboratory
FROM: 10:00AM TO 12:00PM

This research proposes to study the effect of tip gap leakage flow in a High Pressure Turbine by means of a high resolution Embedded Large Eddy Simulation. URANS simulations of turbomachinery flows fail to accurately represent the vortical structures seen in experimental studies.

Read More…

Apr

4

2017

PhD Candidate Xufei Wu - "The Role of Multi-Carrier Interaction in Thermal Transport and Energy Conversion in Crystal Materials"

WHERE: 103 Multidisciplinary Research Building
FROM: 3:00PM TO 5:00PM

Thermal properties play important roles in applications such as high efficiency thermoelectric materials and the thermal management of electronic devices. While electrons dominate thermal transport in metal, phonons (i.e., the quanta of lattice vibrations) are the primary energy carriers in crystalline insulators and semiconductors such as Silicon and Germanium. A fundamental understanding of the transport properties of multiple carriers including phonons and electrons can enable us to better design nanoscale materials.

Read More…

Mar

31

2017

PhD Candidate Lawrence W. Funke - "Synthesis and Control Of Planar Morphing Mechanisms for Industrial Applications"

WHERE: 213 DeBartolo Hall
FROM: 3:00PM TO 5:00PM

The structures of many revolutionary technologies, such as aircraft wings, an­tennas, wind turbine blades, and dies for polymer extrusion, have remained largely unchanged for decades. In the 21st Century, researchers have started to investigate us­ing planar morphing mechanisms to increase the flexibility and real time performance of such systems.

Read More…

Mar

30

2017

PhD Candidate Edwin R. Mathews, Jr. - "A Numerical and Theoretical Analysis of Aero-Optics With Application to an Optical Turret"

WHERE: 103 Multidisciplinary Research Building
FROM: 8:00AM TO 10:30AM

When an optical beam is transmitted through a compressible turbulent flow, it is distorted due to the non-uniform speed of light resulting from density fluctuations. The distortion caused by turbulent airflow surrounding a projecting or receiving aperture, known as aero-optics, is a major impediment to applications of airborne laser systems.

Read More…